nolongerinbetween

Posts Tagged ‘palestine

The silence of the international community is deafening. The lack of outrage and moral indignation over what’s happening in Israel these days is appalling. We take action on the ethnic cleansing of Uighur in Xinjiang but not on the ethnic cleansing of Palestinians in Israel. We impose sanctions for the occupation of Crimea but not for the occupation of Palestine. Since 1967 we turn a blind eye to persecution, oppression, arbitrary detentions, deportation, house demolition, unfair trials in courts, forced evictions of Palestinian families from their homes replaced with illegal settlements, ethnic cleansing, a brutal siege of what’s became the largest open-air prison on earth – Gaza, restrictions of their freedom of movement, a disproportionate response by the occupiers to the violence of the occupied, inhumane and humiliating treatement (skunk water anyone?), constant harassment, administrative abuse and bullying at the hands of settlers, police, army, local authorities, government in order to make their life unbearable and so to drive them out, and ultimately what is an overt national project of colonization and an apartheid regime in the West Bank. Israel’s breaching of international and humanitarian laws and of previous agreements they signed is done with impunity and with the tacit consent of the West. I might sound racially prejudiced, if not downright anti-semite, but nowadays I wouldn’t trust a Jew’s words even if he would tell me the water is wet or that one plus one equals two. We build museums and memorials about the Holocaust in order to raise awareness and not to repeat the past. And, lo and behold, it’s exactly what we are doing. We look, once again, the other way when these atrocities take place. The notion that we allowed the oppressed to turn into oppressor is surreal. I can’t think of anything more disturbing than to see someone who suffered the horrors of Holocaust inflicting them on other people. Turning Gaza into a cvasi concentration camp. Abusing power with impunity. Dehumanizing innocent people while mob lynching them. Their moral standing is deeply dented and they now need themselves to learn about Shoah. How fucked up is that?

And I’m sick and tired of people defending Israel’s position by playing Mercutio’s line over and over: “a plague on both your houses”. The “both sides are to blame” game. The incessant whataboutism. None of this would have happened without the brutal attack of the Israeli Police on Palestinian worshippers at the Al-Aqsa Mosque. We can keep both sides accountable for their wrongdoings and trespassings but it’s not like the Montague and Capulet families stand on an equal footing in this eternal feud. Let’s not forget the root issue which is Occupation. One side is the occupier and the other side is occupied. The failure of our western civilization to be indignant over Israeli (supposedly temporary) military occupation and oppressing the Palestinian people and the fact that Israel can get away with anything is sickening. 

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Little did I know when I started reading this book that I would become a convert. Like I said in one of my previous posts, I long to question my beliefs, to be challenged and ultimately to be defeated through sound arguments. I never knew exactly what was going on in Israel, between them and the Palestinian people. I just had a general idea about Zionism, how they succeeded in getting a state of their own post-Holocaust in 1948 and how all these led to tensions between the new settlers and the native inhabitants of those lands. Other than this I was completely ignorant and somehow reluctant to tackle the subject since I assumed it was too damn complicated for me. Nevertheless, as a Christian I understandably had a biased propensity for the Israeli cause and that was enough for me to settle on. While I still believe in their historical right to be on these lands, before reading this book I was completely oblivious to the terrible cost they imposed on the Palestinian people. I am utterly shocked and disgusted at the way Israel handled the whole affair of getting back on that soil.  For a nation that went through such terrible ordeals during the Second World War (deportation, ethnic cleansing, expropriation, dehumanization, along with all sorts of humiliation and abuses) to inflict them on other people is beyond my understanding. I am at a loss to how on earth the whole world witnessed this without putting an end to it. Criticism is not enough. You don’t criticise a rapist when perpetrating his brutal assault. You try to stop him. And then you make sure to prevent this from happening again. That was the lesson of Shoah after all, wasn’t it? To remember the past in order not to repeat it. Given the appalling amnesia of the chosen people and until the horrific pain inflicted on their step brothers will cease I have no choice but to be a pro-Palestinian Christian…

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NB. Just to make it clear, I am not in support of using violence as means to achieve a legitimate goal. The first Palestinian Intifada was brutally and ruthlessly suppressed by the Israeli army even though was peaceful and non-violent. The second one however was violent and ended up feeding the horrific cycle of violence. I abhor Hamas and the Islamist militants, and I abhor the Israeli army’s unnecessary killings and abuses to the same extent. I am perfectly aware that the Palestinians don’t have a monopoly on the victim archetype and I’m not naïve when it comes to their stubbornness or reluctance to come to terms with the new reality of an Israeli state. But I was naïve about Israelis’ moral integrity and the mere imbalance of power between the occupier and the occupied leaves me no choice than to support the underdog…

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literatura e efortul inepuizabil de a transforma viaţa în ceva real

The priest: Aren't you afraid of hell? J. Kerouac: No, no. I'm more concerned with heaven.

literatura e efortul inepuizabil de a transforma viaţa în ceva real

The priest: Aren't you afraid of hell? J. Kerouac: No, no. I'm more concerned with heaven.